I am Henry Finch by Alexis Deacon and Viviane Schwarz

posted in: Alexis Deacon, Viviane Schwarz | 17

Are you ever too old for a picture book?

Walk into a bookshop, and you’ll rarely find a picture book on the shelves labelled 5-8, 9-12 or Teenage/Young Adult (the age bandings used in the most widespread chain of bookshops in the UK), implicitly telling buyers that picture books are only for those under 5.

But what if you have a picture book about Descartes’s philosophical statement “Je pense donc je suis” or to put it another way “Cogito Ergo Sum”?

A book which not only explores learning to listen to yourself, to trust your own instincts but also what it feels like when you think you have failed and how to fight against the dark thoughts that then crowd in.

Gosh, if only we all knew everything we needed to know about these issues by the time we were five! Wouldn’t life be much simpler?

henryfinchfrontcoverI am Henry Finch written by Alexis Deacon and illustrated by Viviane Schwarz is a new picture book which makes readers and listeners think about every one of these big concepts and more. It’s about being brave, about being independent, about feeling secure enough to not follow the crowd (though also being happy to be part of a community).

It’s also about totally adorable little birds and one terribly monstrous beast who wants to eat them all up.

Henry is just one of a huge flock of finches. They make a racket all day long, doing the same as each other over and again but one day Henry starts thinking for himself. He starts to have his own dreams, his own vision of who he could be, independent from the community he’s grown up in.

Alexis Deacon has written (although not specifically about Henry Finch):

“It seems to me that if every character in your story is entirely on message and engaged with the world you have created it can be very off-putting for the reader. I find that I am drawn to stories where not every character follows the grain: Reluctant characters, perverse characters, selfish characters, irreverent characters. They are often the catalysts for action too.”

And Henry Finch does indeed go against the grain, doing things differently to those around him, daring to be different. But he’s not selfish. In fact, his ability to think for himself gives him the courage to tackle the monster who threatens his family and friends.

Danger, doubt and darkness beset Henry, but he survives and shares what he has learned with his fellow finches, sparking a cascade of individual ideas and wishes as they each set off to explore the world, though not before reassuring each other that “We will come back“; the finches are thinking for themselves, but individuality doesn’t have to lead to the destruction of their community.

henryfinchinterior1

Deacon’s story is full of food for thought, opportunities for discussion and debate, whether you’re 4 or 40 or more. The meaty issues explored never become overwhelming, not least because Viviane Schwarz’s illustrations bring so much humour, delight and simplicity into the story.

The use of fingerprints to illustrate a narrative about what it means to be an individual is a stroke of genius; is there a more powerful symbol of individual human identity than the imprint left by the small ridges on the tips of our fingers? They also bring massive child appeal; mucky fingerprints on walls and furniture are unavoidable aspects of life with children, and so there is nothing like these marks to proudly proclaim, “Hey, I’m here, me, this child, and I can make a mark on the world around me!”.

henryfinchinterior2

I really like how Schwarz sometimes brings her real life community into her artwork. In her graphic novel The Sleepwalkers there are crowd scenes filled with real people she knows, and in I am Henry Finch, she’s included fingerprints from friends as well as her own. The joy she’s had in creating these images can be seen in the hugely expressive faces and wings of the finches, and that seeped into us: we just had to make our own flock of finches using the same technique.

We started out with inkpads, paper and lots of messy fingerprints…

drawingfinches2

…but soon we were experimenting with other sorts of prints too…

drawingfinches3

Then we added beaks and wings…

drawingfinches

And soon we had our very own chattering of finches:

fingerprints5

One or two elephants interloped! (these were made from prints using the side of our fists – click here to see what Viv Schwarz created with similar prints)

fingerprints4

These finches were born from toe-prints, whilst the beasts were heel-prints:

fingerprints3

They just kept on coming, causing havoc, and just getting on with doing their own thing.

fingerprint2

Whilst fingerprinting and making our own flock of birds we listened to:

  • Fingerprints by I Am Kloot
  • All Around the World or the Myth of Fingerprints by Paul Simon with Los Lobos
  • Fingerprints by Patsy Cline


  • Other activities which could work well alongside reading I am Henry Finch include:

  • Going to hear Alexis talk about this book at Discover (in London) on March 8.
  • Making up your own body organs, from watercolour blobs. You’ll see both why this is relevant and how you could do it if you check out this post from Viviane Schwarz.
  • Learning how to dust for fingerprints, using these helpful (teacher/technician/student) notes from Creative Chemistry.

  • I’ve more philosophy in the form of illustrated books coming up soon on the blog, with offerings from the Netherlands and Spain. What are your favourite picture books which deal with the big issues in life?

    Disclosure: I received a free review copy of I am Henry Finch from the publishers.

    17 Responses

    1. Oh… your toe prints are the best! And I love the new blog design. So clean and user friendly! Just checked and unfortunately, Henry Finch has not made it stateside. Will keep an eye out for it !
      Stacey recently posted..Reading Aloud is Important

    2. Love the sound of this book. I’m all for ‘going against the grain’ and encouraging children to have the confidence to do this if this it is true to themselves.

      The fingerprint pictures are adorable, especially the annotated one! We sometimes make fingerprint robins for Christmas cards, but I think we are going to have to create a whole fingerprint world now…
      Claire Potter recently posted..Cut it up, stand it up, hang it up: 3 quirky ways to showcase your children’s art

    3. This looks like a wonderful book! I am totally with you on this Zoe – it is such a shame that picture books are marketed more towards the younger readers only as they have so much to offer. I must go and get a copy of this now! 🙂
      Sam recently posted..Thank you and Happy New Year!

    4. Hi Sam, one of the things I like about this book is that I think it works well for a broad range, including young listeners.
      Zoe recently posted..I am Henry Finch by Alexis Deacon and Viviane Schwarz

    5. Sorry Sam, should have clarified that a bit more. Some picture books really are perfect for older readers in terms of language, length, illustration, but don’t work so well for younger ones. The Findus and Pettson ones for example, are a bit too long for many a 2 or 3 year old, but this one I think works well for both a 10 year old and a 3 year old, each getting different things out of it.
      Zoe recently posted..I am Henry Finch by Alexis Deacon and Viviane Schwarz

    6. I’m such a fan of Alexis Deacon (BEEGU!!) and the way you’ve described this book is super. Cannot wait to read it for myself. 🙂
      danielle @ this picture book life recently posted..10 wonderful picture books for winter

    7. I like your kids’ art best!!! And I am a total Deacon fan!

    8. I just love the artwork you’ve done here – amazing stuff!
      Elli Woollard recently posted..January Briefing of the CTU* (* Christmas Tree Union)

    9. Picture books that work for multiple ages are such a treasure. When the illustrations inspire creativity in children like this one has, then it is over the top.

      All the artwork is amazing, but the elephant-beasts made from the heel prints are just delightful.
      Roberta recently posted..It is Bloggiesta Mini-Challenge Time

      • Thank you Roberta, it’s a great book for all sorts of interactions – from conversations through to artwork and more.

    10. Awesome Zoe! Love the art your kids produced!

      1. Thumbprints remind me of the Thumb Thumb Thambi books that Tulika published in India 🙂
      http://www.saffrontree.org/2010/01/thumb-thumb-thambi-and-thumb-thumb.html

      2. Picture books for adults – entirely on a tangent, but came across these awesome books recently, include many science and philosophy type topics:
      http://www.amazon.co.uk/Introducing-Quantum-Theory-Graphic-Guide/dp/1840468505

    11. […] and not following the crowd and can be enjoyed for several years.  I love the fun activities Zoe came up with after reading this book with her […]

    Leave a Reply

    CommentLuv badge